William Gillis

The Freed Market




A short writing that puts forward an interesting proposal: to stop using the expression "free market" in order to qualify the current reality, and use instead the expression "freed market". This would contribute to make clear to everybody that the corporatist-mercantilist system in which we live now is anything but a free market. Moreover, the expression "freed market" would represent "an implicit call to action". And without personal action, no change towards freedom is ever possible.



One of the tactics I've taken up in the anarchist economics wars is to refer to our modern corporatist/mercantilist/lovecraftian mix of economic systems as "Kapitalism" and when referencing Ancaps go out of my way to use "Anarcho"-Capitalist and Anarcho-"Capitalist" as distinct labels.

These have proved decent if not pretty effective ways of kicking a wedge into their thinking and forcing a degree of nuance into the discussion. But they're distinctions primarily aimed at the willfully ignorant bullying Reds who - while certainly annoying - are nowhere near as atrocious as the out-and-out Vulgar Libertarians. The corporate apologists who actually approve of the modern cesspit the Reds call "Capitalism." You know the ones. The contrarian brats who consider Somalia a utopia. The ones that fit the Reds' stereotypes so hardcore that all intelligence is immediately sucked into an event horizon of "poor people obviously deserve to starve to death, screw 'em" and "yeah, well after the Revolution we’ll put your family in death camps and expropriate all your stuff."

Well, by blessed typo I've stumbled across a very effective counter to them. Instead of referring to the behavior and dynamics of the free market, I refer instead to “a freed market.”

You'd be surprised how much of a difference a change of tense can make.
"Free market" makes it sound like such a thing already exists and thus passively perpetuates the Red myth that Corporatism and wanton accumulation of Kapital are the natural consequences of free association and competition between individuals. (It is not.)

But "freed" has an element of distance and, whatsmore, a degree of action to it. It becomes so much easier to state things like: Freed markets don't have corporations. A freed market naturally equalizes wealth. Social hierarchy is by definition inefficient and this is particularly evident in freed markets.

It moves us out of the present tense and into the theoretical realm of "after the revolution," where like the Reds we can still use present day examples to back theory, but we're not tied into implicitly defending every horror in today's market. It's easier to pick out separate mechanics in the market and make distinctions. Also, have I mentioned that it makes an implicit call to action?

I don't know if anyone else has stumbled over this before, but it's been useful and I felt I should share.


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